Dating younger girls college

Everyone says it: “Girls mature faster than boys.” From the days of having cooties in kindergarten, we’ve been led to believe that boys our age are too childish for us.And while we love checking them out on the quad—whomever created “shirts versus skins” deserves a national holiday in his or her honor—we can’t help but think that college guys still have some growing up to do.“The female brain fully develops earlier and sooner than the male brain,” says Patrick Wanis, a human behavior expert and author of .According to this relationship expert, a girl’s prefrontal cortex, which allows us to make rational decisions instead of ones that are based on emotional impulses, matures at ages 20 to 22.But while you may love trotting around with your youthful boy toy, not everyone may embrace this trendy reputation.Luckily, Rachel’s parents were supportive of her and her younger beau.Our lovely male counterparts’ prefrontal cortexes, on the other hand, do not mature until they are 22 to 24 years old. Scientifically speaking, your boy toy probably won’t have the same mature priorities as you do.From Samantha Jones to Kourtney Kardashian, being a “cougar” has taken on a rather glamorous stereotype.

But be warned, the conversation may get a little serious if he starts talking about the future.With seniors, grad students, and working 20-somethings to swoon over, dating an older guy is an appealing option.At the same time, some collegiettes love pursuing freshmen boys when they’re upperclass(wo)men: a younger guy’s carefree spirit is endearing, he probably doesn’t know your ex, and, let’s be honest, age is just a number when a gorgeous guy comes along.There’s nothing wrong with dating someone older or younger (as long as you’re both the age of consent), but this situation has its own set of consequences to consider.We talked to collegiettes across the nation and relationship experts to see how an age difference impacts different aspects of a relationship.

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